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can you get shocked by telephone lines?


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#1 fuz!on

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:37 PM

can you get shocked by telephone lines? are the similar to power lines?

#2 quittin' time

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 01:35 PM

I was under the impression that the ring voltage on a telephone line was around 48 volts, which would be a pretty good tingle in the right place at the right time.

Or maybe it used to be......before everything went digital.

I'll be interested to find out.

Maybe a bona fide telephone man will step in here and clue us in.

I might be way off base --- I dunno.


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#3 639trbl

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 01:54 PM

LIKE QT-AM ON THE POWER SIDE...BUT YEARS AGO, WHEN THE TELEPHONE WAS RUN --OPEN WIRE--ALONG OUR POLE LINES--IT WAS ALWAYS JUST RIGHT TO HAVE YOUR LEGS IN IT...........WHEN YOU WERE ON HOOKS...WORKING ON SECONDARY/SERVICES......AND IF YOU WERE HOT AND SWEATY, AND GOT ACROSS IT..SOMETIMES THE RINGING VOLTAGE--I THINK THEN WAS ABOUT 90V DC--NOT SURE---BUT IT WOULD LIGHT YOU UP :angel-smiley-017[1]:

#4 kong

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Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:21 PM

It is 48 volts when the phone is on the hook and 90 volts when it is ringing. Circuits can be up to 300 volts. Nothing too bad. Just lick your pinky and stick it in a phone jack and get a feel for it.

It isn't bad unless you are elbow deep in a paper splice and are constantly getting bit by pairs.

#5 fuz!on

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:44 AM

It is 48 volts when the phone is on the hook and 90 volts when it is ringing.  Circuits can be up to 300 volts.  Nothing too bad.  Just lick your pinky and stick it in a phone jack and get a feel for it. 

It isn't bad unless you are elbow deep in a paper splice and are constantly getting bit by pairs.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


has anyone ever been killed by getting shocked by a telephone line?

#6 crippledlineman

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 07:48 AM

We hit some phone lines one day(we were supposed to be hand clearing the hole, screw that) with the auger and we decided to splice it back together ourselves. We had this guy on our crew for the week that was nearly legally deaf but he could barely hear you when you talked. He decided he was gonna splice the phone lines with his mouth, after we highly advised him not to; it popped him right on the tongue. He jumped straight up and said "Got damn, it bit me".....After we rolled around for a few at his expense we decided to finish up and let the foreman chew us out for putting the auger in the ground. It was worth it though....... :D

#7 Justbill

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 09:51 AM

Short answer is yes. As was stated, idle you're going to get around 48 volts DC, if you're on moist ground or you are touching a ground it can tingle ya. Ringing voltages is 85-105 volts at 20 hertz, they call it hertz for a reason, ringing voltage will get your attention. Now you add in dial long line units or range extenders and the current goes up and so does the bite you get. The only way it can kill ya is if you fall off the pole when you get bit. The old toll leads had 130 volts positive on one side and 130 negative on the other, that would knock the crap out of ya!

Edited by Justbill, 19 January 2006 - 09:53 AM.


#8 linemandave

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 04:55 PM

I was removing a bridge tap the other day and had ahold of both tip and ring when a call came across. Scared me enough to leave a stain! :ernaehrung004[1]:

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#9 Kevin

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Posted 19 January 2006 - 05:25 PM

I got my jaws locked on an unmarked Conklin circuit not long ago, it's marked now. OUCH!

#10 nutsleft

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 04:36 AM

Has anyone used the cm8 systems? 256 volts on tip and ring. Also there are certain situations that arise were serious injury or death can occur while splicing. The aluminium
sheath around the cable pairs serves two purposes, one of those is giving current a source to ground(lightning, power contact) and if someone is splicing with no sheath continuity, they have the potential to be a path to ground.

#11 fuz!on

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 04:59 AM

Has anyone used the cm8 systems? 256 volts on tip and ring. Also there are certain situations that arise were serious injury or death can occur while splicing. The aluminium
sheath around the cable pairs serves two purposes, one of those is giving current a source to ground(lightning, power contact) and if someone is splicing with no sheath continuity, they have the potential to be a path to ground.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

do you guys wear gloves like the power lineman do to protect from electrical shock?

Edited by fuz!on, 20 January 2006 - 04:59 AM.


#12 nutsleft

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Posted 20 January 2006 - 06:09 PM

do you guys wear gloves like the power lineman do to protect from electrical shock?


It is difficult to splice with gloves on, conductors range from 19 gauge to 24 gauge.
During line construction, certain senerios would require the use of rubber gloves. But very few at that.

It isn't bad unless you are elbow deep in a paper splice and are constantly getting bit by pairs.


Nothing is as fun as that.

#13 Peepers

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 04:11 AM

Didn't you hear the story about the dog peeing on a phone line?
i'd tell it to you but I don't remember the details of it.

the doggy got shcoked every time the phone rang

#14 fuz!on

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 06:34 AM

Didn't you hear the story about the dog peeing on a phone line?
i'd tell it to you but I don't remember the details of it.

the doggy got shcoked every time the phone rang

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

yeah i remember it lol. it was a funny story.

#15 Copperdoc

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 02:12 PM

YES U CAN, on hook voltage, 48 volt, is enough to tingle your fingers, off hook, 90 to 110 volts will get your attention pretty quickly, and conklins, two channels, and spec circuits, 240 to 300 volts, will make you speak in tongues and if you happen to be standing in snow or water, it will make you do all sorts of interesting things!!! But just remember if you get hit make sure you look around and see if anyone saw you do it! :D

#16 Dave72

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Posted 07 March 2006 - 07:29 PM

Just a tip, from someone who's been tingled once too many times..

If ya end up in a situation where you're sittin in some wet muck etc.. and you know you're gonna get shocked a bunch while resplicing a cable (when ya get the jolt, the splice rig jerks around on account of your hand having its own mind at the time).

Take a jumper cable of sorts (transfer clip, or some 19g wire with alligator clips) and ground from the frame of your splice rig (picabond machine, etc) to a screwdriver stuck into the ground.

As you splice, this lower resistance path to ground should sink most of the volts for ya.

ON a funny note.. I hate the type of office frame MDF protection that has exposed pins on the sides.. like Reliable 302 type etc.. you reach in your arm for something, and get a whack from some line, so you jerk away.. right into the other vertical frame.. get another whack... back and forth like some bumper-ball game.

I guess thats where long-sleeves are better.. but Id hate to have to hide my (molson) muscle. (heck, its bought n paid for.. ) :devil-smiley-024[1]:

#17 Justbill

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 09:14 AM

You can alway tell a new frameman by the blood on the back of his hands.

#18 opt729

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 04:01 PM

phone lines are idle at -48 volts DC, when they ring they jump up to about 85-95 volts dc. Some T-1 lines or "special circuits"are usually at about 180 volts. Give or take. the normal ones just feel like a little tingle, but the T-1's can have a little bite, youll know when you found one of those. But NOOOO they wont kill you! The only thing that kills you is if they get energized by power somewhere down the run, but then youre dealing with power not phone lines.

Use youre Voltage detectors if youre not sure. I have seen them save three guys personally, they do make a difference. :pissedoff[1]:

#19 madd splicer

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Posted 08 March 2006 - 06:43 PM

Just a tip, from someone who's been tingled once too many times..

If ya end up in a situation where you're sittin in some wet muck etc.. and you know you're gonna get shocked a bunch while resplicing a cable (when ya get the jolt, the splice rig jerks around on account of your hand having its own mind at the time).

Take a jumper cable of sorts (transfer clip, or some 19g wire with alligator clips) and ground from the frame of your splice rig (picabond machine, etc) to a screwdriver stuck into the ground.

As you splice, this lower resistance path to ground should sink most of the volts for ya.

ON a funny note.. I hate the type of office frame MDF protection that has exposed pins on the sides.. like Reliable 302 type etc..  you reach in your arm for something, and get a whack from some line, so you jerk away.. right into the other vertical frame.. get another whack... back and forth like some bumper-ball game.   

I guess thats where long-sleeves are better.. but Id hate to have to hide my (molson) muscle.  (heck, its bought n paid for.. )    :Voskl1[1]:

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


glad to hear i'm not the only one that's happened to... :Voskl1[1]:

MS

#20 Jimbo

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Posted 20 March 2006 - 02:29 PM

Gawd, this brings back memorys from the old days, sittin on a metal milk crate( splicer set it up for a reason ) transfering toll circuit counts ( I was an apprentice at the time) Ok, cut pair one he tells me over the headset, YYYYAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH, snips flew out of the pit into the parking lot behind me & I landed out of the pit myself!!!!! I could hear laughing from all over as the other crews were in on it too. Boy was I steamed at the time but all things have a way of filtering down to the new apprentice that I had the honor of training.
Jimbo



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