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Lineman schools yay or nay?


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#1 TomB07

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 11:47 PM

Hey everyone I am wanting to get into the Lineman field someday and I am looking for the best way to get started. I have found a few schools that offer training geared towards becoming a lineman and they claim a 80% after school hiring rate. The schools after tuition, fees and gear cost about 12-14,000 and would require me to move out of state for 4 months. Are these schools worth the money and are their hiring percentages honest? Also what jobs do the schools actually qualify you for and realistically what would the starting salaries be?

If the schools aren't a good option to get started what should I do to get qualified on my own. Should I go get my Class A Divers license, Flag certification, and take some more Algebra college classes? Are there any other classes I should look into, because assume electrician courses would be more for residential or commercial applications which isn't something that would benefit me would it?

Any advice would be helpful and if the schools are worth it to do which one would you recommend?

Tom B

#2 ConnLineKid

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 07:52 AM

Welcome to the forums Tom. Some people say that line school isn't worth the money. All of the lineman I know started their careers through the IBEW apprenticeship. The only problem about the apprenticeship is the wait. Some people get hired right after their interview and some people, like myself, have been waiting nearly 2 long years. This is why I have decided to apply to SLTC, graduate and then come home and reapply to the apprenticeship. It will show that I am serious about becoming a lineman and makes me a much more qualified applicant.

#3 TomB07

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 09:08 AM

Forgive my ignorance of terminology and union structured apprenticeships but what is the IBEW and how do you apply for their apprenticeship? I am also wondering what you mean about getting hired is the two year waiting period your going through to get into the apprenticeship program or to even get your foot in the door as a entry level grunt?

Is the SLTC another apprenticeship program or is that a pay for training school geared towards becoming a lineman? When you finish one of the school programs does that qualify you to go into a apprenticeship program or to simply get your foot int the door as a groundman on a crew? I don't mind paying for the training if it will benefit me I have about 12.000 in savings so I would only really need to borrow enough to pay for rent and the basics while im out of state. I don't mind taking on a little short time debt but would be unpleasant to unload my life savings and end up unable to even get my foot in the door. LOL not to mention having to go back and ask for my old job as a cna again after leaving the state for a few months for school.





Welcome to the forums Tom. Some people say that line school isn't worth the money. All of the lineman I know started their careers through the IBEW apprenticeship. The only problem about the apprenticeship is the wait. Some people get hired right after their interview and some people, like myself, have been waiting nearly 2 long years. This is why I have decided to apply to SLTC, graduate and then come home and reapply to the apprenticeship. It will show that I am serious about becoming a lineman and makes me a much more qualified applicant.



#4 ConnLineKid

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Posted 19 June 2011 - 08:35 PM

The IBEW (international brotherhood of electrical workers) is a union for people working in the electrical field. They offer a apprenticeship but sometimes it can be hard to get into. Its a paid, learn on the job program, along with some weekend classes and bookwork. For more info on it check out www.neat1968.org
SLTC is a line school. Another line school is NLC. For more info on SLTC check out www.lineworker.com
Line school prepares you to become a productive first step apprentice. At line school you learn the fundamentals of linework such as climbing, rigging, theory, CDL training, personal grounding, safety, ECT. Some schools do have HR people come from power companys and they might give you a job interview.

#5 TomB07

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 01:22 AM

Thanks for the clarifications on terminology and links. I know that the schools make you a more qualified applicant for a apprenticeship but would that be enough to qualify me to get a entry level position as a grounman to get my foot in the door with a company while I wait for an apprenticeship to come through? I read an apprenticeship application for my state and it required at least 1 year groundman experience to apply so would going to school satisfy the requirements to get in as a groundman?

I also have a question about the Class A drivers license training they offer isn't that the same license that you use drive a big rig? I dont want to be a truck driver but I see their adds in the paper all the time. If that's the right license and I have to wait awhile to get my foot in the door with a company maybe I could pay the bills driving until a real opportunity comes around.

The IBEW (international brotherhood of electrical workers) is a union for people working in the electrical field. They offer a apprenticeship but sometimes it can be hard to get into. Its a paid, learn on the job program, along with some weekend classes and bookwork. For more info on it check out www.neat1968.org
SLTC is a line school. Another line school is NLC. For more info on SLTC check out www.lineworker.com
Line school prepares you to become a productive first step apprentice. At line school you learn the fundamentals of linework such as climbing, rigging, theory, CDL training, personal grounding, safety, ECT. Some schools do have HR people come from power companys and they might give you a job interview.



#6 ConnLineKid

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 04:55 AM

School should be more than enough to help you get in the door. I know some people who have become grunts right off the street. I'd suggest calling your local union hall and asking them if they ate hiring any grunts. As for a CDL lisence, it is the same lisence for driving big rigs but its almost always required in the field of linework. You will be driving derrick diggers, bucket trucks and trailers with poles on them. As for you paying for CDL training/licensing its a great idea but isn't cheap.

#7 TomB07

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 04:46 PM

The SLTC school is looking pretty good I sent away for information today. They offer as part of your training A Class CDL training and licensing don't they why would it be expensive to get? It is listed on they program overview for the 15 week program.

Anyone have any idea what Georgia weather would be over a 4 month period from the start of the next term would be? I am from Washington State and have never been to Georgia so I have no idea what to expect or how to pack in terms of cloths for that region.

School should be more than enough to help you get in the door. I know some people who have become grunts right off the street. I'd suggest calling your local union hall and asking them if they ate hiring any grunts. As for a CDL lisence, it is the same lisence for driving big rigs but its almost always required in the field of linework. You will be driving derrick diggers, bucket trucks and trailers with poles on them. As for you paying for CDL training/licensing its a great idea but isn't cheap.



#8 olo131

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 05:22 PM

Pack thin in the summer and I think you will enjoy the winters being your from Wash. St. The harshest part last about a month or so. I don't know this to be fact, I live in north Fl and it get way to cold here for this southern boy.


BTW

Welcome to the site and Good Luck with your adventure.

#9 ConnLineKid

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 06:37 PM

Long sleeves are required for climbing. Call the school and talk to someone in the office. They are extremely friendly and really helpful. They might be able to give you some tips on what to pack. I will be staying in the substation while I'm there.

#10 GlenB

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 11:35 PM

Look into Volta. You should be able to find a link for it on IBEW125.com 125 is your local union.
Some local schools are Volta, National line college, also Clackamas community college has one too that they started up

Volta and NLC are both recognized schools for the apprenticeship through the union. Where as the CCC one is not.
Volta is out in warrenton on the oregon coast by astoria. NLC is in boise, CCC is in wilsonville.

Hiring percentages are just that, how many of their students are working(not necessarily in that field but have actual jobs.) Take that one with a grain of salt.

From people I know that have done the 3 schools I listed.
NLC- if you do well you will probably get hired on at a non-union shop out of texas.
Volta- What the union recommends as it is their training program. you will be moving throughout their territory
CCC- its a partnership with PGE. Only 1 person who has gone through this program has been hired on permanently as an apprentice.

NLC and Volta you do need to buy your own tools and you will travel and have living expenses throughout schooling.
CCC they supply tools and you could possibly live at home and just make the commute to school.

CCC does not get you a CDL(which is a big deal when applying for the apprenticeship) Last I heard you would not place higher then 200 without one. The other two schools get you a cdl.

When I researched them costs were roughly

NLC-12000 plus tools
Volta-6500 plus tools
CCC-6000 no tools

Hope that helps

#11 WV_Lineman

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 12:46 PM

There is a school in West Virginia that cost around 7,500, and it is a years worth of training. Once you finish you are considered a C lineman. That is the school I attended, BUT..BUT...it didn't cost nearly that much money. I got hired out of class 6 months into school. And you are not required to pay the full amount, just for each section, which last 3 months ea I think. Anyways, all together I paid 1,200 dollars for 6 months of school. I got hired by Mastec as a C apprentice (I was one of the top in my class). Line skewl is the way to go bro. You wont regret it at allll. GL

#12 adamysr

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 08:55 AM

whats the school called in WV?

#13 Ministroker214

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 02:43 PM

I am in the same boat..I have a 2 year degree..not in electrical, but my uncle said if I get my class B liscense, it shouldn't be too hard to get me in..but do you need a class A? Because around here it's around 10 grand for it.

#14 makohon

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 12:19 PM

why is it 10K for class a? i took my permit test for 60 bux or so and i rented a truck for 6 hrs for 600 bucks....??? i have a full blown class a for less than 700



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